Author Assistant Services

Are you an author in need of help and looking for an assistant on a full-time, part-time, or as-needed basis? Well, then I'm your gal! Learn more about the services I provide HERE.

Saturday, March 25, 2017

6th MMGM: The Sand Warrior (5 Worlds #1) by Mark and Alexis Seigel (spotlight)

Welcome to Day 25 of the 6th Annual March MG Madness, featuring Mark and Alexis Seigel and their book, The Sand Warrior!



The Sand Warrior
(5 Worlds #1)
By Mark Seigel and Alexis Seigel
Illustrated by Xanthe Bouma, Matt Rockefeller, Boya Sun
May 2, 2017
Random House BFYR
The Five Worlds are on the brink of extinction unless five ancient and mysterious beacons are lit. When war erupts, three unlikely heroes will discover there's more to themselves and more to their worlds than meets the eye. . . .

The clumsiest student at the Sand Dancer Academy, Oona Lee is a fighter with a destiny bigger than she could ever imagine.

A boy from the poorest slums, An Tzu has a surprising gift and a knack for getting out of sticky situations.

Star athlete Jax Amboy is beloved by an entire galaxy, but what good is that when he has no real friends?

When these three kids are forced to team up on an epic quest, it will take not one, not two, but 5 WORLDS to contain all the magic and adventure!


Praise for The Sand Warrior
“This stellar team has created a gorgeous and entrancing world like no other!” —Noelle Stevenson, New York Times bestselling author of Nimona
“Epic action, adventure, and mystery will draw you in, but the heartfelt characters and their seemingly impossible journey will keep you turning the pages.” —Lisa Yee, author of the DC Super Hero Girls™ series

Friday, March 24, 2017

6th MMGM: The Door in the Alley by Adrienne Kress (review, guest post, giveaway)

Welcome to Day 24 of the 6th Annual March MG Madness, featuring Adrienne Kress and her book, The Door In The Alley!


The Door in the Alley
(The Explorers #1)
By Adrienne Kress
April 25, 2017
Delacorte BFYR
Featuring a mysterious society, a secretive past, and a pig in a teeny hat, "The Explorers: The Door in the Alley" is the first book in a new series for fans of "The Name of This Book Is a Secret" and "The Mysterious Benedict Society. "Knock once if you can find it but only members are allowed inside.

This is one of those stories that start with a pig in a teeny hat. It s not the one you re thinking about. (This story is way better than that one.)

This pig-in-a-teeny-hat story starts when a very uninquisitive boy stumbles upon a very mysterious society. After that, there is danger and adventure; there are missing persons, hired thugs, a hidden box, a lost map, and famous explorers; and there is a girl looking for help that only uninquisitive boys can offer.

"The Explorers: The Door in the Alley" is the first book in a series that is sure to hit young readers right in the funny bone."




Sebastian, a studious; no nonsense; all logic kind of boy, and Evie, an orphan who doesn’t mind a bit of nonsense and illogical adventure, are about to have their worlds collide. And it all starts with a pig in a teeny hat, a door in an alley, and a secret society full of explorers. The middle is full of nasty thugs, puzzles to solve, and adventure to be had. While the ending is all startling revelations, mysteries solved, and cliffhangers to dangle from...it’s safe to say that Sebastian and Evie’s lives will never, ever, no-way, no-how, cannot be the same!

Adrienne Kress’ The Door In The Alley is a delightful and rollicking romp of a story! Sparkling with adventure, mystery, humor, likable characters, and zany fun, I found myself smiling the whole way through this middle-grade.

The Door In The Alley is funny...like, giggle-snort inducing, actually lol’ing kind of funny. With a charmingly cheeky and whimsically wacky voice and witty footnotes, this story is seriously amusing, entertaining, and clever.  The mysterious society Sebastian finds himself employed at (via punishment) is a wondrous, topsy-turvy place, full of the unexpected, incredible bits and bobbles, and sometimes the downright weird and creepy...and young readers will love every nook and cranny of the wack-a-doodle place!

Kress takes Sebastian, Evie, and readers on a thrilling and unforgettable adventure, full of melted men, crabby TAs, giant snakes, helpful llamas, plane crashes, and yes, animals in teeny hats! Sebastian, Evie, and the grown-up explorers we meet, are likable, engaging characters that make wonderful adventure companions for readers.

The Door In The Alley has so much fun, laughs, and imagination bubbling out of it, making it such an irresistible and impossible to put down read!


by Adrienne Kress

There are many interesting, odd, brave, and sometimes dangerous, characters in The Explorers: The Door in the Alley. But none has found its way to such instant fame as quickly as the pig in the teeny hat:

(Illustration by Matt Rockefeller)

And why shouldn’t he be so popular? A well-dressed animal is always held in high regard. At least, I know I always consider animals in outfits to have a real sense of pride in their own grooming habits. This is why I have compiled a list of what I consider to be some of the better-dressed animals from classic children’s novels. I have decided to entitle this list:  

SOME OF THE BETTER-DRESSED ANIMALS FROM CLASSIC CHILDREN’S NOVELS

1. The White Rabbit – Alice in Wonderland (by Lewis Carroll)
Being an animal has many benefits – the ability to fly, run very fast, be generally adorable and fuzzy. But there is at least one drawback: no pockets.  So what is a rabbit supposed to do when he must keep track of the time but has no pocket in which to place his pocket watch? I suppose, yes, a wristwatch could be a solution, but why sacrifice style when there’s a far better fix: get yourself a distinguished-looking waistcoat.

(Illustration by Sir John Tenniel)

2. Puss – Puss in Boots (by Charles Perrault)
Sometimes as an animal you decide you prefer to walk on two legs instead of the usual four that you have. Then you get a new owner and want to test him to see how much he likes and respects you. So you ask for a pair of boots. And your owner is kind enough to provide an elegant pair. Not only do you now look rather dashing, but you also know you have his full respect. And you end up helping him win the hand of the princess. Because that’s what loyal pets do. Especially loyal pets in quality footwear.

(Illustration by G.P. Jacomb Hood)

3. Mr. Toad – The Wind in the Willows (by Kenneth Grahame)
Clothing can definitely make you look stylish, but it can also just be a practical necessity. Especially when you have no fur to shield yourself from the elements as you drive your car at extremely fast speeds around the countryside. For such a thing you’ll need a good large overcoat and a pair of goggles, of course, as well as gaiters, gloves and cap to complete the look. And if you are as well off as Mr. Toad of Toad Hall, such items will be of the finest quality.

(Illustration by Ernest H. Shepard)

4. Piglet – Winnie the Pooh (by A.A. Milne)
Sometimes one needs to hunt for Woozles. Obviously. But sometimes the weather quite simply will not co-operate with one’s plans. So, while Woozle hunting is obviously a far more comfortable thing to do in the warmer months, when Woozle tracks appear in the snow, what is a little pig to do? Well, he must dress himself for the weather so that he is appropriately attired for the chase. And what better way to stay warm and cozy while tracking Woozles than wearing a nice scarf, as demonstrated in this case by the ever practical Piglet? (Interestingly, this particular pig chose not to wear a hat, despite the cold, thus demonstrating that not all pigs think alike.)

(Illustration by Ernest H. Shepard)

5. Stuart – Stuart Little (by E.B. White)

It’s a very special thing to be adopted by a loving family.  And even if you happen to be a mouse and they happen to be human, that doesn’t mean you can’t have things in common, for example: a fondness for dressing well.  It’s always wonderful to have elegant role models. But to have them living under the very same roof with you is the height of convenience. So follow their example.  Get yourself a suit, a hat and a cane and look stylish.

(Illustration by Garth Williams)

6. Nana — Peter Pan (by J.M. Barrie)
Like humans, animals have a variety of jobs they can perform. There are carrier pigeons, there are workhorses and there are mice who run through mazes for example. And as a true professional one must dress to suit one’s job. So of course when one is a nursemaid to the three rambunctious children of the Darling household, one must make sure to command due respect by wearing an iconic nurse’s cap. Now not only do the children know who’s boss, so too does the rest of the neighborhood when Nana takes the children for their daily walks.

(Illustration by Trina Schart Hyman)


Adrienne Kress is a Toronto-born actor and author who loves to play make-believe. She also loves hot chocolate. And cheese. Not necessarily together.
She is the author of the award winning and internationally published children’s novels Alex and the Ironic Gentleman and Timothy and the Dragon’s Gate (Scholastic). Published around the world, Alex won the Heart of Hawick Children’s Book Award in the UK and was shortlisted for the Red Cedar. The sequel, Timothy, was shortlisted for the Audie, Red Cedar and Manitoba Young Readers Choice Awards, and was optioned for film.  She has also published two YA novels:  Outcast (Diversion Books), her quirky paranormal romance, and the Steampunk adventure The Friday Society (Penguin), released to a starred review from Quill and Quire and shortlisted for The Quill Awards.
2016 saw the release of Hatter Madigan: Ghost in the H.A.T.B.O.X., an exciting collaboration with NY Times bestselling author Frank Beddor (set in the same world as his Looking Glass Wars YA books). And this April she releases the first book in her new Middle Grade series: The Explorers: The Door In The Alley (Delacorte, Random House).


Win an ARC of The Door in the Alley!
Random House has generously offered one (1) ARC for one winner.
-US
-ends 4/5/17
-winner will be emailed and must claim prize within 48 hours
-Word Spelunking is not responsible for lost, damaged, or stolen prizes

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Thursday, March 23, 2017

6th MMGM: Matylda, Bright & Tender Blog Tour (review, interview)

Welcome to Day 23 of the 6th Annual March MG Madness, featuring the Matylda, Bright & Tender Blog Tour, from author Holly M. McGhee and Candlewick Press!




Matylda, Bright & Tender
By Holly M. McGhee
March 14, 2017
Candlewick Press
Source: from pub for review
In a courageous debut novel, Holly M. McGhee explores the loss that shakes one girl’s world — and the unexpected consequences of the things we do for love.


Sussy and Guy are best friends, fourth-graders who share their silliest thoughts and deepest hopes. One afternoon, the two of them decide they must have something of their very own to love. After a trip to the pet store, they bring home a spotted lizard, the one with the ancient face and starfish toes, and they name her Matylda (with a y so it’s all her own). With Guy leading the way, they feed her and give her an origin story fit for a warrior lizard. A few weeks later, on a simple bike ride, there is a terrible accident. As hard as it is, Sussy is sure she can hold on to Guy if she can find a way to love Matylda enough. But in a startling turn of events, Sussy reconsiders what it means to grieve and heal and hope and go on, for her own sake and Matylda’s. By turns both devastating and buoyant, this story is a brave one, showing how far we can justify going for a real and true friend.

Goodreads / Amazon / B&N / Indiebound



Fourth graders, Sussy and Guy, are the very best of friends. They share everything together and love each other very much. When the two BFFs decide they need something of their own to love and nurture, they get a leopard gecko named Matylda. Even though Guy seems a bit better at handling and feeding Matylda, Sussy is determined to love her just as much. And when a tragic accident shakes Sussy’s world topsy-turvy, both Sussy and Matylda discover things about love, loss, and friendship that they never knew.

Ok, y’all, you better have the tissues handy when reading this book because it’s a heartbreaking, sniffle-inducing, tearjerker for sure! Holly M. McGhee’s Matylda, Bright & Tender is aptly named, for it is both tender and bright, heart-wrenching and heartwarming, poignant and full of hope.

Told through Sussy’s POV, Matylda, Bright & Tender unfolds through an earnest, vulnerable, and sweetly charming voice. Young readers will fall in love with Sussy, Guy, their parents, and Matylda, and will love experiencing and exploring their world so full of laughs, love, and heart. Sussy and Guy’s genuine, love-filled friendship is so endearing and lovable and I just wanted to wrap them both in a gigantic hug.

It’s not a spoiler to say that the story takes a tragic turn and one character’s death leaves the other characters in a world of grief and greyness. Holly M. McGhee beautifully and achingly explores the pains and startling revelations that come with grief and loss, and does so in ways that are appropriate and accessible to her intended audience.

Sussy, Guy, and Matylda’s story is the kind that sits in your heart for a long time and, while it brings the tears, and also brings so much light, hope, and happiness. Readers, young and old alike, will love and be moved by Matylda, Bright & Tender.




Q1. What three words best describe your book, Matylda, Bright & Tender?
Love. Geckos. Hope.

Q2. Grab a copy of Matylda, Bright & Tender and answer the following:
Favorite chapter? Chapter 32, I think, because that’s when Sussy is finally in the light again and she is buoyant / hopeful / the future is hers—no ceilings!

Favorite page? Page 195 maybe, when Sussy understands that Guy’s death can be folded into who she is / she doesn’t have to fight it anymore.

Favorite setting? I am very fond of the herp department in Total Pets, the pet store in the neighborhood. And the goldfish section too.

Flip to a random page and give us a 1-2 sentences teaser: 193 “You’re not scared anymore, are you?” She’d been that dull color for a few days, so I knew this might be coming . . . but her timing, it couldn’t be a coincidence. “You want to start over, too?” I rolled her skin, fresh, between my fingers.

Q3. Who are your favorite middle-grade hero and heroine? What is your favorite middle-grade book?
That’s an impossible question, especially as I read so much as an agent. But Stanley Yelnats from Holes comes to mind immediately, as well as Charlotte from Charlotte’s Web. For favorite novel, I might have to say The Long Winter by Laura Ingalls Wilder, although I can barely stand the thought of reading it again because I am always worried it will end differently and they won’t survive. (I’ve read it to each of my children and we are always on the edge of our seats with worry.)

Q4. Why do you think middle-grade lit is so important?
What better way to learn about the challenges of life than between the covers of a book? What better to show our children they can get through anything?

Q5. If you were to create and bake a cupcake inspired by Matylda, Bright & Tender, what would it look and taste like, and what would you call it?
Have you ever had those chocolates that are infused with spices? My cupcake would be very, very dark chocolate with turmeric icing—I would call it The Warrior; it would bring strength and daring to those who eat it.




Holly M. McGhee, who formerly wrote under the name Hallie Durand, is the author of three picture books, including Mitchell’s License and Mitchell Goes Bowling, both illustrated by Tony Fucile, and a chapter-book series. She lives with her family, her antisocial dog, and her two leopard geckos (Speedy and Midnight) in Maplewood, New Jersey.